State-Of-The-Art Warehouse To Open In Dubai

Centre Point Logistics (CPL), a prominent company in warehousing, logistics and storage facilities, is set to cement its position in the regional and global markets even more with the new state-of-the-art warehouse that is set to be unveiled in Dubai’s Logistics District. The new warehouse is said to exhibit some of the worlds best features including impeccable interior design style and some of the best warehouse lighting in Dubai, which is adding to the prominence of this world class city.

The ultramodern warehouse facility is scheduled to open towards the end of 2016 in October, if everything goes according to plan. The 22,550 square-meter warehouse mirrors the philosophy to broaden its reach in the ever growing region of United Arab Emirates, who is dubbed as one of the most important logistical countries in the world, with it being the gateway to the world’s thriving markets of South-East Asia and Africa.

The new warehouse will be used for the storage, distribution, and other services that add value to both the business and customers. The Centre Point Logistics warehouse will be built with the highest quality temperature control system and state of the art network security to cater for all aspects of logistical cargo, offering many integrated logistics services including an asset tracking system, warehousing, transportation, equipment, skilled and technical labour and all other kinds of logistic operations management.

The forecasted turnover of CPL after completion of the new warehouse is forecasted to rise by an estimated 50 million (AED). This figure is supported by the already invested AED 100 million of logistics infrastructure already established in the United Arab Emirates region. For investors, this is a very promising and encouraging opportunity.

The new warehouse that will be finished towards the end of 2016 will enable CPL to increase its market share, increase operational efficiency with project management systems, and see profit margins rise dramatically. This heavy investment from CPL couldn’t occur at a better time, with global demand for solid logistics infrastructure in the UAE region to support the growing global logistics sector. CPL sees its major advancement with the Dubai South logistic District, which will provide the ideal platform to assist regional growth for CPL in the future.

A potential partnership between CPL and Dubai South will see CPL being able to extend its geographical reach to provide high quality services to the rest of the world. Such a partnership will create new jobs for locals in regions including Dubai and its surrounding regions by providing jobs as small as building new infrastructure such as new street lighting, to assisting in building the new state-of-the-art facility.

Never Released Before Pictures of Plymouth’s World-Class Attraction

I recently found this article on the web and found it to be a very interesting read. I can’t believe how much it costs to build such unbelievable structures and transform them into world-class masterpieces. I hope you enjoy the read.

 

Never Released Before Pictures of Plymouth’s World-Class AttractionEXCLUSIVE: Striking new pictures released of Plymouth’s £34million world-class attraction

 

Amazing images display how Plymouth’s £34million state of the art attraction will appear in four years time have been issued.

The impressive plans show how Plymouth’s Museum and Art Gallery will be transformed into a state-of-the-art history centre with world famous custom showcases, in time for the 2020 Mayflower celebrations.

Designed by architects Atkins, the centre will nestle behind the existing museum and art gallery frontage.

“We’ve got some of the best people out there working on this,” said Council leader Tudor Evans, “and the concepts look incredibly exciting.

“They’ve come up with a really striking building and some of the interior spaces will be jaw-dropping.”

The architectural plans feature a cantilevered ‘floating’ box with reflective cladding, which will form the heart of the impressive building.

Other existing buildings will be converted into interactive and fun exhibition spaces containing galleries that will include a giant mammoth, a flotilla of historic ships, massive original figureheads and interactive laminated maps that you can walk through.
Cllr Evans said: “This centre will be a complete game-changer for arts and culture in Plymouth. It will not only explore Plymouth’s amazing history in new and exciting ways but it will also bring world-class arts and culture right to our doorstep.”

The planning application is due to be considered in June this year, and the existing museum and art gallery will close in September.

Subject to permission, work will start early in 2017.

Earlier this year the project billed as the city’s equivalent of London’s Turbine Hall, was handed £4.2million from Arts Council England – propelling the project further forward.

The plans show how impressive exhibition and gallery spaces will be created to show off existing collections, as well as new flexible spaces that will host some of the best exhibitions from around the country.

The centre includes a space of 3,500 metres squared for galleries and exhibitions, this will include 11 temporary spaces (five for local and national touring exhibitions, six for specific projects), and 5 permanent galleries.

A major Mayflower exhibition will feature in one of the main galleries when the centre opens in time for Mayflower 400 in four years time.

“I can’t imagine that there’ll be anyone in Plymouth who won’t be able to get excited about exploring it,” added Cllr Evans.

“There’ll be something for everyone whether they are bringing their kids for a fun day out, exploring their family history or visiting a top class art event.

“We’ll have events and exhibitions right on our doorsteps that you’d currently have to travel hundreds of miles to see.

“It is also great for Plymouth and will create hundreds of jobs and boost the city’s economy by increasing the number of day visitors to Plymouth and overnight stays.”

Galleries will also celebrate and explore subjects such as Plymothians who have been influential on the world stage such as Drake and Scott of the Antarctic; the city’s relationship with the Royal Navy; life in Plymouth below the waterline, including marine life and shipwrecks made from timber products; Plymouth’s prehistoric landscape and the West Country’s artistic legacy, including Sir Joshua Reynolds, the Cottonian collection and the Newlyn School of Artists.

There will be also multi-media spaces using the latest technology to enable people to explore the thousands of images and films that form part of the South West Image Bank and the South West Film and Television Archive.

The proposals will turn Tavistock Place into a public square – something it used to be before the current museum and library were built in the early part of the 20th century.

A pedestrianised piazza will provide a space for events and street entertainment and high-quality food outlets with plenty of street lighting making this an event not to be missed.

The council says this will enable the museum to include a refurbished St Luke’s to be converted to a large art gallery with modular exhibition spaces that will open up Plymouth and the South West peninsula to major touring exhibitions.

Councillor Peter Smith, deputy leader, said the history centre is the “biggest and most exciting culture and heritage project” the South West has seen in the past decade.

“Plymouth has played an incredible role in the history of the region,” he said, “and the world and this is something we need to shout about.

“But it’s not just about attracting visitors to spend money in the city. This will be an incredible resource for our residents, our schools, local historians. We are working with our partners to create somewhere people can learn, research and feel a sense of pride in Plymouth, as well as just have fun.”

 

Map Worth The World Seeks Human Restoration

For fans, there are (as The Beach Boys famously sing) good, good, good, good vibrations. But there are only bad, bad, bad, bad vibrations when you are a delicate treasure more than 350 years of ages.

On Monday and down in the Quarantine cellars of the National Library of Australia (“Authorised Persons Only– Heavy Fines Use. Quarantine Act 1908” signs caution) one of the Library’s dearest treasures was getting ready for a journey, with security guards and network security monitoring the maps position 24/7 to ensure its safety..

Archipelagus Orientalis, sive Asiaticus the 1663 map of New Holland was carefully set up in a specially-made-just-for-it vibration-defying cage. These shipping crates and its contents in turn are the precious freight (the only product aboard, and with its own special messenger riding shotgun) on a journey to the University of Melbourne. The map requires some specialised conservation analysis and so it is being sent moving southwards to where professionals await it.

On Monday the library (making us for an hour honorary authorised persons under the Quarantine Act 1908) welcomed us, and the ABC, to enjoy the dramatic placing of the map into its dog crate. Slightly nervous people present included the library’s manager of maps Dr Martin Woods, the manager of preservation services Denyl Cloughley, conservation laboratory supervisor Lisa Jeong-Reuss and Peter Faulkner (we will pertain to his rank and function in a moment). And, fittingly, they were the 4 individuals who reverently raised the huge map (it measures 1185mm x 1520mm) off a bench and installed it in the dog crate, their design reminding one of diligent pole-bearers bearing a casket from A to B.

The map fitted exactly into its inner rack in the cage.

“What if it had not fitted?” somebody wondered.

But absolutely nothing has actually fitted exactly what it was meant for quite so seamlessly since the well-known moment when Cinderella’s elegant little hoof moved into the glass slipper proffered by the Good-looking Prince.

Peter Faulkner, whose work and title everybody on Monday had a hard time to define, is the man who crafts the encouraging artful innards of the crates under the warehouse lighting in which any NLA treasure ever takes a trip. And to call Tuesday’s huge, flat, tangerine-coloured container a “cage” is to do it a severe oppression. It is like calling a Ming Vase a “container” or Cinderella’s crystal slipper a “boot”

To stamp out almost all threats of bad, bad, bad, bad vibrations Faulkner creates crate innards of foam-covered beams and struts specifically shaped pieces of foam. Monday’s crate for the popular map was a masterpiece in its own right. So too are his specially made containers (he showed them to me with quiet pride) for two valuable and fragile worlds of the world that have just come home to Canberra from travels to other Australian exhibitions services elsewhere. Dr Woods believes that of all the things the library ever sends on the roadway these sorts of globes position the biggest product packaging challenges.

Yes, after all they remain in shape and in fragility really like huge, fresh eggs. However Peter Faulkner’s fancy globe packaging’s rise to these obstacles.

Craftsmen who make wooden barrels are called coopers and artisans who make great wheels are called wheelwrights, however Faulkner’s craft, though essential to institutions like the library, appears to have no name. Packagesmith? Wrappingwright? He and his library associates had a lively go at specifying him on Monday, calling him things like “Pete the Home builder” and “Peter the exhibitions go-to man.” On the other hand, as you read this (particularly if you read it on Tuesday morning) Faulkner’s very dog crate and its valuable contents are being carefully rotated down the Hume.

Archipelagus Orientalis, sive Asiaticus (the eastern or Asian island chain), created for the Dutch East India Business by master cartographer Joan Blaeu, terribly requires this coming conservation assistance. The library encourages that “Verdigris, a dazzling blue-green pigment, was used as an ornamental aspect to decorate the surface of the map. However over the last 350 years the pigment has rusted to become a brown crust on the surface, damaging the paper beneath and surrounding the pigment.” Yes, on Tuesday the interesting map (it boasts the first reporting of New Holland and New Zealand in the Dutch language and includes, for the very first time, details of the sighting of Tasmania by Abel Tasman’s crew aboard the Zeehaen on 24 November, 1642) offered an unhealthy, pale greenish tone. It was suggestive of the colour of the cheeks of the poorer sailors amongst those whose trips it served.

It was obtained by the library after being discovered in 2010 suffering in a facility in Sweden where it is believed to have actually invested most of its life. The library obtained it in 2013, with support from the federal government. Specialist National Library staff stabilised it in 2013 so it could safely go on program during the Mapping Our World exhibit, and a crowdfunding appeal for funds with which to complete its stabilisation was extremely successful. That appeal has actually assisted to send it to university and be shown under the spectacular exhibition flood lighting, to the vibrant University of Melbourne where we hope it will arrive late on Tuesday after a vibrationless journey.